Cocktail Glass Guide

You've invested in top-shelf spirits, picked up a bottle of Lo-Fi Aperitifs, mixed a perfectly balanced cocktail, and then strained it...into your favorite mug. You've either got to do your dishes, or take a trip to Umami Mart to update your glassware selection. After all, just as booze and ice determine how delicious your cocktail will be, the glass also plays an important roll.

Here is every glass that all aspiring home bartenders should keep in their cupboard:


Cocktail
The traditional cocktail glass is an inverted cone bowl, usually around 3 to 6 ounces. It is used to serve cocktails without ice, or ‘up’. The stem lifts the bowl up and away from your hands, keeping your cocktails delightfully chilled. The large mouth allows the drinker to get close to the surface of the drink and fully enjoy its aromatics. Use it for shaken or stirred cocktails without ice.

Coupe
The coupe is the more contemporary version of the traditional martini glass - it's better looking cousin if you will. The same rules apply, but it is ideal for cocktails meant to be strained, since the shape does well to show off a good looking drink.

Nick & Nora
Based on glasses used in the Thin Man series of films from the 1930s and 1940s, the drinks meant for this type of glass are the same as for the coupe and martini glass. These glasses have recently gained popularity and we're keeping our hands full with them.

Rocks Glass
Also known as the Old Fashioned glass, it’s perfect for a drink that's built in the same glass you're serving it in. The thick bottom is designed for muddling and the short profile means it's ideal for smaller, higher proof pours. The shape also lets a drink warm in your hand to subtly change the flavor profile.

Flute
A slim elegant glass typically used to serve champagne and sparkling wine. The tall shape of the glass helps prevent the drink going flat too fast, because the bubbles are rising slower.

Tall
Much like a champagne flute, the tall and narrow shape of this glass keeps your drink cold and carbonated because of its limited surface area. It’s perfect for drinks with ice or with some sort of fizzy element. Think gin + tonics and soda cocktails.